The types of Mental health problems Associated with your Mind

There are many different mental health problems, and many symptoms are common to more than one diagnosis. So you may experience the symptoms of more than one mental health problem at once.

This page provides a brief description of the following mental health problems, and explains where you can find more information on them:

Mental Health Depression

Depression is a feeling of low mood that lasts for a long time and affects your everyday life. It can make you feel hopeless, despairing, guilty, worthless, unmotivated and exhausted. It can affect your self-esteem, sleep, appetite, sex drive and, sometimes, your physical health. In its mildest form, depression doesn’t stop you leading a normal life, but it makes everything harder to do and seem less worthwhile. At its most severe, depression can make you feel suicidal, and be life-threatening.

There are also some common specific forms of depression, such as:

  • postnatal depression (PND) – depression that can develop from between two weeks to up to two years after becoming a parent. It’s usually diagnosed in mothers, but can affect partners too.
  • seasonal affective disorder (SAD) – depression that is related to day length and usually (but not always) occurs in the winter.

Depression feels like I am locked in a black room inside myself.

Anxiety

Anxiety refers to strong feelings of unease, worry and fear. Because occasional anxiety is a normal human experience, it’s sometimes hard to know when it’s becoming a mental health problem – but if your feelings of anxiety are very strong, or last for a long time, they can be overwhelming.

You might experience:

  • constant worrying about things that are a regular part of everyday life, or about things that aren’t likely to happen.
  • unpleasant physical symptoms such as sleep problems, panic attacks, an increased heartbeat, an upset stomach, muscle tension or feeling shaky.
  • a specific anxiety disorder, such as generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, a phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

OCD is a type of anxiety disorder. The term is often misused in daily conversation – for example, you might hear people talk about being ‘a bit OCD’, if they like things to be neat and tidy. But the reality of this disorder is a lot more complex and serious.

OCD has two main parts:

  • obsessions – intrusive thoughts, ideas or urges that repeatedly appear in your mind. For example, thinking that you have been contaminated by dirt and germs, or worrying that you might hurt someone.
  • compulsions – repetitive activities that you feel you have to do. This could be something like repeatedly washing something to make sure it’s clean or repeating a specific phrase in your head to prevent harm from coming to a loved one.

The aim of a compulsion is to relieve the intense anxiety caused by obsessive thoughts. However, the process of repeating these compulsions is often distressing in itself, and any relief you feel is often short-lived.

Phobias

A phobia is an extreme form of fear or anxiety triggered by a particular situation (such as going outside) or object (such as spiders), even when there is no danger. A fear becomes a phobia if it lasts for more than six months, and has a significant impact on how you live your day-to-day life. For example, you may begin to organise your life around avoiding the thing that you fear.

Eating problems

Eating problems aren’t just about food. They can be about difficult things in your life and painful feelings, which you may be finding hard to express, face or resolve. Focusing on food can be a way of disguising these problems, even from yourself.

The most common eating problems are:

  • anorexia – not allowing yourself to eat enough food to get the energy and nutrition you need to stay physically healthy. Sometime people assume that anorexia is about slimming and dieting, but it is often connected to very low self-esteem, negative self-image and feelings of intense distress.
  • bulimia – finding that you eat large amounts of food all in one go, often because you are feeling upset or worried (this is called bingeing); then feeling deeply guilty or ashamed, and taking steps to get rid of the food you have eaten (this is called purging).
  • binge eating disorder – feeling that you can’t stop yourself from eating, even when you want to. This is sometimes described as having a food addiction or compulsive eating.
  • eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) – this diagnosis means you meet some of the criteria for one of the above disorders, but not all of them.

Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder (previously called manic depression) mainly affects your mood. With this diagnosis you are likely to have times when you experience:

Everyone has variations in their mood, but in bipolar disorder these changes can be very distressing and have a big impact on your life. You may feel that your high and low moods are extreme, and that swings in your mood are overwhelming. In between, you might have stable times where you experience fewer symptoms.

[At first it’s] loss of interest in doing anything. I have to force myself to do tasks. Then it’s as though I’m in catch up. Mind full of ideas, feel fantastic, doing three things at once.

Schizophrenia

You may receive a diagnosis of schizophrenia if you have symptoms such as:

  • psychotic experiences, for example hallucinations or delusions
  • disorganised thinking
  • a lack of interest in things
  • feeling disconnected from your feelings
  • wanting to avoid people

This diagnosis can be controversial as not all people who experience such things agree that they have a mental health problem, or that the term ‘schizophrenia’ is the best way to describe their experiences.

Personality disorders

Personality disorders are a type of mental health problem where your attitudes, beliefs and behaviours cause you longstanding problems in your life. There are several different types of personality disorder, but the two most commonly diagnosed ones are:

  • borderline personality disorder (BPD) – you might be given this diagnosis if you experience things like intense, changeable moods, an overwhelming fear of abandonment, an unstable sense of identity and impulsive, risky behaviour. Some people prefer the term ‘emotionally unstable personality disorder’ (EUPD) to BPD, as they feel it’s a more accurate description of the symptoms.
  • antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) – you might be given this diagnosis if you experience things like disregard for the feelings and needs of others, manipulating others for your own gain, difficulty maintaining relationships, feeling little guilt for your actions and feeling easily bored or aggressive.

Having BPD is like the emotional version of being a burn victim. Everything in the world hurts more than it seems to for everyone else and any ‘thick skin’ you are supposed to have just isn’t there.

If you’re given a diagnosis of a personality disorder, it’s understandable to feel like you’re being told that who you are is ‘wrong’. But a personality disorder does not mean that you’re a bad person, or that you have a bad personality.

Source : mind

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