The 25 Best Jane Austen Quotes

1. ‘It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.’ Pride and Prejudice

2. ‘Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.’ Mansfield Park

3. ‘The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.’ Northanger Abbey

4. ‘To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.’ Pride and Prejudice

5. ‘Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.’ Mansfield Park

6. ‘A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.’ Pride and Prejudice

7. ‘There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.’ Pride and Prejudice

8. ‘Nobody minds having what is too good for them.’ Mansfield Park

9. ‘A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.’ Mansfield Park

10. ‘Is not general incivility the very essence of love?’ Pride and Prejudice

11. ‘Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like.’ Mansfield Park

12. ‘You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.’ Pride and Prejudice

13. ‘Those who do not complain are never pitied.’ Pride and Prejudice

14. ‘It isn’t what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.’ Sense and Sensibility

15. ‘How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!’ Persuasion

16. ‘There are people, who the more you do for them, the less they will do for themselves.’ Emma

17. ‘For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours and laugh at them in our turn?’ Pride and Prejudice

18. ‘To flatter and follow others, without being flattered and followed in turn, is but a state of half enjoyment.’ Persuasion

19. ‘Business, you know, may bring you money, but friendship hardly ever does.’ Emma

20. ‘Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.’ Pride and Prejudice

21. ‘There are certainly not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them.’ Mansfield Park

22. ‘I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other.’ Emma

23. ‘My sore throats are always worse than anyone’s.’ Persuasion

24. ‘Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed in love a little now and then. It is something to think of.’ Pride and Prejudice

25. ‘It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage.’ Emma

Some Other Famous Quotes Given By Jane Austen

On love

“There are as many forms of love as there are moments in time.” — Personal correspondence

“No man is offended by another man’s admiration of the woman he loves; it is the woman only who can make it a torment.” —Northanger Abbey (1817)

“One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.” —Emma (1815)

“The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!” —Sense and Sensibility (1811)

“If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more.” —Emma (1815)

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On marriage

“Marriage is indeed a manoeuvring business.” —Mansfield Park (1814)

“Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed in love a little now and then.” —Pride and Prejudice (1813)

“Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.” —Pride and Prejudice (1813)

On women and men

“I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.” —Persuasion (1817)

“Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.” —Mansfield Park (1814)

“One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.” —Pride and Prejudice (1813)

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On life

“Surprises are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.” —Emma (1815)

“Know your own happiness. Want for nothing but patience – or give it a more fascinating name: Call it hope.” —Sense and Sensibility (1811)

“There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.” —Northanger Abbey (1817)

“Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.” —Mansfield Park (1814)

On art

“Every savage can dance.” —Pride and Prejudice (1813)

“The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.” —Northanger Abbey (1817)

“Without music, life would be a blank to me.” —Emma (1815)

“To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.” —Pride and Prejudice (1813)

dance Austen

On fashion

“To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.” —Northanger Abbey (1817)

“Dress is at all times a frivolous distinction, and excessive solicitude about it often destroys its own aim.” —Northanger Abbey (1817)

“One man’s style must not be the rule of another’s.” —Emma (1815)

On leisure

“To sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.” —Mansfield Park (1814)

“One cannot have too large a party.” —Emma (1815)

“Indulge your imagination in every possible flight.” —Pride and Prejudice (1813)

“They are much to be pitied who have not been given a taste for nature early in life.” —Mansfield Park (1814)

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On society

“It is very difficult for the prosperous to be humble.” —Emma (1815)

“I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.” — Personal correspondence

“Vanity working on a weak head, produces every sort of mischief.” —Emma (1815)

“The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.” —Pride and Prejudice (1813)

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